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A Light Dish for a Hot Night

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A Light Dish for a Hot Night
Crudo of Snapper from Chef Michael Kramer of The Lazy Goat in Greenville, SC. Photo by Jennifer Hitchcock
Photo by Rush Jagoe
New Orlean's Chef Justin Devillier's Lamb Tartare with Quail Eggs and Crispy Quinoa

Carpaccios and tartares face some stiff competition these days. Across the South these once popular dishes are more and more being pushed aside and replaced with Crudos. All 3 dishes feature raw elements that can include fish, meat or even vegetables, but vary in how they are served and their accompaniments.

Carpaccios are prepared by thinly slicing the meat, traditionally beef tenderloin, drizzling it with an acid, such as a vinaigrette made with lemon or mustard, then topping it with greens and slivers of parmesan cheese. Tartares are traditionally made from raw beef or tuna, finely chopped and served with capers, mustard, a raw egg yolk and toast points.

Porcini Mushroom Carpaccio
from Chef Patrick O’Connell of The Inn at Little Washington, Washington, VA

Ahi Tuna Tartare
from Braden Wages of Malai Kitchen, Dallas, TX

Lamb Tartare with Quail Eggs and Crispy Quinoa
from Justin Devillier of La Petite Grocery, New Orleans, LA

Crudos focus much more on the raw element, letting the main ingredient shine, usually fish. Slice it thin and pair it with olive oil, an, and complements like avocado, peppers, peaches, orange segments or whatever strikes your fancy. All preparations require the freshest ingredients.

Crudo of Snapper
from Chef Michael Kramer of The Lazy Goat in Greenville, SC

Crudo of Snapper from Chef Michael Kramer of The Lazy Goat in Greenville, SC
Chef Kramer's Crudo of Snapper. Photo by Jennifer Hitchcock

Perched on the bank of the Reedy River in Greenville, South Carolina, The Lazy Goat offers Mediterranean-inspired cuisine prepared by Chef Michael Kramer. Before taking over the helm at The Lazy Goat, Chef Kramer was the chef at McCrady’s in downtown Charleston where he earned AAA’s 4 Diamond award and the title “Best New Restaurant” by Esquire magazine. The man knows his way around the kitchen. Chef Kramer uses snapper in his crudo and tops it with thinly sliced Serrano chili, radish and Fuji apple making it a light and refreshing dish for these balmy summer days.