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Barley-infused Port from the Fridge

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Barley Infused Port Inline Text
Photo by Shannon O'Hara

Leslie Ross of Triniti in Houston, Texas is a creative mixologist, and one who inspires us to try new things at our home bars (cucumber ribbons anyone?). Here, she gives us a peek inside her creative process, in this case, for creating port that is cold-infused with roasted barley:

“I borrowed this method from brewing beer. I worked at Saint Arnold Brewing Company for almost three years. In brewing, it is known as a decoction, taking a small amount of the mash and applying heat (or not) and then adding it back into the full mash to bring it to proper temperature, and therefore adding a rich malt character.”

“Almost all German styles are done this way. For cocktail purposes, this technique is used to impart a deep flavor without the bitterness that specialty malt can have if too much quantity or heat is used. It is also the same idea used with cold pressed coffee: extract maximum flavor, minus bitterness and acid. I take ¼ of the Port and vacuum seal it with a mixture of chocolate malt, roast malt, and Carafa Malt, and place in refrigerator for 24-48 hours. This creates a very intensely flavored port, which I then add back to the rest until desired depth of flavor is achieved.”

Editor’s Note: Then use your new barley-infused port in The Skyefall.