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Food, Fun and Danger (the good kind) at Alton Brown’s Live Show Eat Your Science

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This photo is from the Edible Inevitable tour and NOT the Eat Your Science tour. Prepare for brand-new food experiments that will blow the house off – well we hope not but you get the idea. Photo by David Allen.

Alton Brown had his first culinary disaster when he was only four years old. While sitting in his pajamas watching cartoons, he decided to make his own breakfast—a bowl of Captain Crunch cereal. Fortunately for all of us, he accidently grabbed the bottle of milk with the green cap instead of the usual blue, and unknowingly filled his bowl with buttermilk, an error he did not realize until his mouth was full of the buttermilk and Captain Crunch mixture. He called this experience a “hideous betrayal” but it set him on the path of careful record keeping, organization and culinary curiosity.

Today, Chef Alton Brown has a vast culinary knowledge that was showcased in his long-running Food Network show Good Eats. The show can still be seen on the Cooking Channel but wrapped up after eleven years of production in 2011. Since then he has been busy working on other Food Network productions like Iron Chef America and Cutthroat Kitchen and in April he is kicking off his second live stage show, Alton Brown Live: Eat Your Science.

Similar to his first stage show, Edible Inevitable, his newest show has a variety show format that incorporates music and humor but this year he is adding what he calls “dangerous food experiments.” He has been developing the experiments over the past year but is unsure whether or not they will be successful, and that is all right with him. “People come to the show because they are fans. We bring 110 percent every night, and we have fun, but things might not go well and that’s ok. It is not a super polished show; it is very spontaneous. Things can happen and we will get through them together,” said Alton.

Photo by David Allen
This photo is from the Edible Inevitable tour and NOT the Eat Your Science tour. Prepare for brand-new food experiments that will blow the house off – well we hope not but you get the idea. Photo by David Allen.

Audience participation keeps the show spontaneous. The show’s team brings volunteers from the audience on stage. This is the high point of the evening for Chef Brown. “We never know what they are going to do, especially if there is a bar in the lobby,” he admits.

Alton is keen on keeping the tour interactive as well, so while he is on the road he will be dining exclusively at fan-recommended restaurants. Share your favorite go-to dining spot on Facebook or Twitter using the hashtag to the appropriate city like #ABRoadEatsCHS and #ABRoadEatsFAY.

The show kicks off the first week in April  in Charleston, South Carolina and has tour dates scheduled throughout the country.

Dates for his Southern stops and tickets are now available

4.6.16 / Charleston, South Carolina
4.7.16 / Fayetteville, North Carolina
4.8.16 / Columbia, South Carolina
4.9.16 / Atlanta, Georgia
4.10.16 / Louisville, Kentucky
4.11.16 / Hunstville, Alabama
4.12.16 / Pensacola, Florida
4.13.16 / Nashville, Tennesse
4.15.16 / Durham, North Carolina
4.16.16 / Baltimore, Maryland
4.17.16 / Charlotte, North Carolina