The Local Palate Newsletter
Sign up to recieve news, updates, recipes, cocktails and web exclusives about food culture in the south

Share this article via email

Subscribe

Subscribe
Save 69% off of newsstand price now!

Subscribe to The Local Palate
Palate Teasers eNewsletter Subscribe Send as Gift Customer Service App Store Google Play

Sign up

Sign up to receive fresh recipes, gourmet getaway guides, and other tasty treats in your inbox.

Sipping on Charlotte Spring Seasonals

Advertisement
Photo courtesy of Bird Song Brewing Co.
Photo courtesy of Birdsong Brewing

Spring is officially here in Charlotte, though you wouldn’t know it by the weather. We have had a few nice days—sure—only to have them followed by more cold and wintry precipitation.

But we know brighter days are on the way, if only by the Queen City’s newest beers. NoDa Brewing’s newest, CAVU All Season Ale, is named after such days; CAVU stands for “Ceiling and Visibility Unlimited”, a pilot’s term for perfect flying weather (co-owner Todd Ford was a pilot before opening the brewery). Wheat and pilsner malt provide this 4.6 percent blonde ale with a touch of breadiness, while Mosaic hops contribute soft notes of tropical fruit. It’s on tap now, and will find its way into 16-ounce cans later this spring.

NoDa’s next-door neighbor, Birdsong Brewing, will release Doin’ Thyme Witbier on April 3rd. This refreshing beer is brewed with coriander and, as the name suggests, thyme. An additional layer of herbal and spicy qualities comes from the use of saison yeast.

Speaking of saisons, Triple C Brewing’s Sal’s Paradise Saison returns the second week of April. All of the grain used in this beer was grown just a couple hours west at Riverbend Malt House in Asheville, NC. It will again be brewed with Sorachi Ace hops, which contribute notes of lemon and dill, but the brewery plans to tweak it a bit by adding in some Simcoe hops as well.

Lenny Boy Tea might have built their name off kombucha, but they recently started brewing beer, too. The brewery’s Tart De La Wit starts life as a traditional witbier, but toward the end of fermentation they throw in South Carolina peaches and just a little wild ale yeast. This results in a hazy wheat beer with a mouth-puckering sourness akin to Lenny Boy’s kombucha

Look for these new beers in the Charlotte brewery taprooms, as well as select bars around town. I’ll be there, sipping on spring.