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Larder: Here’s the Rub (and Sauce)

Larder: Here’s the Rub (and Sauce)
Photo by Andrew Cebulka | Styling by Angela Hall

Bring some of the South’s top barbecue joints into your kitchen with these bottled flavor boosters

DRY RUB 

Home Team BBQ
Charleston, South Carolina

This chili powder rub coats both Home Team’s much-loved smoked wings and its tender ribs. Use it to recreate the latter at home in a low-temp oven and you’ve got dinner in a cinch.

HATCH GREEN CHILE BARBECUE SAUCE 

Lewis Barbecue
Charleston, South Carolina

Texas-born barbecuer John Lewis is a hatch chile evangelist—he’s even debuted a block party celebrating the southwestern peppers in his city of Charleston. Citrusy and slightly sweet, this sauce isn’t just for barbecue. Give it a try on tacos, burgers, and eggs.

RUB POTION NO. SWINE 

Sam Jones BBQ
Winterville, North Carolina

Fourth-generation barbecue cook Sam Jones crafted this sweet-meets-heat rub for pork and chicken, but it can season just about anything—shake it over french fries and thank us later.

ORIGINAL WHITE SAUCE

Big Bob Gibson Bar-B-Q
Decatur, Alabama

The origin story for mayo-based sauce is a bit murky. We know railway worker “Big” Bob Gibson whipped up the first batch back in the 1920s. How the idea came to him is anyone’s guess, but one thing’s for sure: It’s smoky chicken’s soul mate.

SWEET GEORGIA SOUL 

Southern Soul Barbeque
St. Simons Island, Georgia

Blending the prideful sauce traditions of the Carolinas—mustard-based, tangy vinegar, tomato-laced—may seem like a bold move, but Georgia’s Southern Soul pulls it off, with plenty of pepper to boot.

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